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20130801
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
: we've got scandals to talk about. the n.s.a. at the very least looking at it. then you have the i.r.s., at the very least should we find out why the person heading up that program wants to take the fifth rather than talk. you have the benghazi attacks which ended up with four americans dead and an attack that lasted for hours in which they never got any help. you would think that is a scandal or something that should be examined and we should get some answers. the fact that some people want the answers, others say it is pursuing a partisan scandal. at least if you listened to jay carney yesterday. >>alisyn: we've been listening to the president the past week who has been inserting the phrase phony scandals into many of his speeches and we've been wondering which ones is he referring to. so yesterday jay carney, his press secretary, was asked that directly. amazingly, he included benghazi, which so many pundits said clearly they can't be calling benghazi a phony scandal. four americans are dead. but in fact he did include benghazi. listen to jay carney yesterday. >> we've seen time
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
the bill barring the nsa from using funds to collect the data records from citizens on the subject and investigation. >> she's my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me. if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office. you can find that on my website, amash.house.gov. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there's something you would like to schedule, an appointment you'd like to schedule if you contact the grand rapids office we can make sure we have someone here to meet with you as well in calhoun county. my district director is jordan bush. he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office, feel free to do so. he's always around except for today but for good cause he's not here today. but he is a great resources with any number of issues. i do telephone town halls from time to time. so if you would like to get out those phone calls please let the staff know. you can talk to ben before you leave. as we do those from time to time that gives you another way to stay
for the reporting from cleveland. >>> nsa leaker edward snowden is free and any moment now may be speaking for the first time since russia dpragranted him a year-long asylum. apparently he's staying with some americans he met online and even has a job waiting for him if he wants it. phil black joins us live from moscow this morning. good morning, phil. >> good morning, chris. the job offer comes from a founder of a popular networking site often described as the russian version of facebook. the lawyer says he's surrounding himself by people he thinks he can trust, people who reached out to him online while stranded at the airport and he says they include american citizens. that man with his back to the camera is edward snowden and this was the moment he left moscow's airport after six weeks ther there. he's' according to his lawyer who is standing next to him in the photo. this document grants snowden permission to live in russia for one year which also keeps him beyond the reach of the united states for that time. ku kucharena describes his location as secret and safe. >> translator: he sa
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
nation's surveillance programs have helped thwart terrorist attacks because of the n.s.a. and f.b.i. personnel who work on these activities every day and working hard to comply with the law to protect our constitutional liberties and keep america safe. and contrast to the efforts of those hardworking, law-abidinging personnel, americans have serious reservations about attorney general holder and clapper who have -- who are ultimately responsible for the management of these programs. we remain gravely concerned about their lack to follow the law, be forthright with the american people and congress, and commitment to protect our actually guaranteed liberties. continued congressional oversight coupled with the terminations of clapper and holder will help restore these fight terrorism without compromising our liberties or creating gaps in our intelligence structure. in addition the removal may start the healing process to restore america's trust in our federal government. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
on the climate. >> host: what about the nsa issue that nfacing? >> guest: it's an interesting issue that concerns me but interesting that when i'm home i don't hear it much. i hear it from a small group of people but when i'm at the coffee shop that one doesn't come up. the irs one comes up a lot of though. >> host: jake in massachusetts on the independent line the republican of nebraska is the guest. >> caller: people think they need to make a lot more money than they should. in that case they should get a good tax credit to the people working good full-time jobs but not making a bunch of money. so, people would want to get a part-time job but not such a great job. it would put more money in their pockets at. and i notice when people get their tax returns and what not, they put all that money back and buy a new tv or read a4a pity the the what help the economy. it's just i talk to people and they think they should be making 20 or $30 an hour because they think they deserve that. but really what i think is if they give a good tax break to the part-time and the people who may be are making the $40
every website every american goes to? must be the n.s.a. i attended a classified briefing, i can't go into anything there, but it appeared before the briefing very clear to me and i still feel this way, that when you blind yourself as to who the enemy is, as we have, purging all kinds of material from our f.b.i. training materials, state department, intelligence materials, as to who radical islamists really are and what they believe, you blind our law enforcement, our security people from the ability to see your enemy. we're not protected. when you have an open border where people are coming across at will and border patrolmen have told us three to four times faster than they ever have since we started talking about handing out legal status to anybody who happened to be here by a certain date, all this talk about amnesty, citizenship, all these other things, do they get benefits? not get benefits? all this talk has increased the number of people coming in by about three to five times. the border is not secure. when you don't control what kind of terrorists may be coming into your coun
not have any further announcements. i am wanting to ask about the nsa's surveillance programs. the threat that they have identified help bolster the case that the surveillance is needed? >> i will not blend those two stories, or those two issues together. haveve a threat that we advised the public about. we have discussed with you in the media, and we are interacting with that threat. we have some issues with unauthorized disclosure of classified inspiration. -- information. we are in a debate about that. we have to protect our security, and the balance in providing security, and protecting privacy is something we are working on. we are working on what that threat represents, and how we can act against it paid we also want to ensure the protection and security of our american people here at home and abroad. i would not blend the two issues. operationally, if the aq kior is weakened, doesn't make it easier, or harder, in terms of all cried as ability to organize a worldwide attack? that some counterterrorism experts might be able to address this with greater detail. the al qaeda core a hea
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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